POLL QUESTION – AUGUST 9
By Leo Haggerty

WITH THE EARLY SUCCESS OF THE “BUBBLE” CONCEPT BY THE NBA AND NHL, SHOULD THE NFL CONSIDER RELOCATING 8 CONFERENCE TEAMS TO FOUR CITIES FOR THE REGULAR SEASON?

It’s Sunday in the big city.  That means one thing.  It’s time for the Its Sports Magazine’s poll question.

This one is more of a supposition.  Our staff was asked the following:

WITH THE EARLY SUCCESS OF THE “BUBBLE” CONCEPT BY THE NBA AND NHL, SHOULD THE NFL CONSIDER RELOCATING 8 CONFERENCE TEAMS TO FOUR CITIES FOR THE REGULAR SEASON?

Hey, the National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League seem to be having success.  Should the NFL consider it?

Again, it seems like it’s working for the NBA and NHL but were talking about rosters twice their size.  That a lot of bodies to concentrate at four separate venues.

A lot of diversity among our 10 individuals that responded.  Enjoy.

JOHN LENTZ – NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL ANALYST
Doesn’t matter!  Who cares!

STEPHEN FOX – PHOTO JOURNALIST
It might be the only way to have a football season. As fast as this virus is spreading if 1 person gets Covid-19 on the team, then the entire team is exposed.

T.J. SHARPE – AFC CHEF
The bubble concept is intriguing to consider when thinking how the NFL (and college football) moves forward with COVID-19 in 2020. The first challenge is roster size; NFL teams are double the MLB and dwarf the other sports. The logistics of bubbles for 32 teams times players, coaches, and support staff is hard to even fathom. Just from that alone, it’s not a solid idea.  Add to that once one person gets infected, the entire bubble is affected, and it makes fielding teams overwhelmingly difficult.  This isn’t baseball where you can call someone else up. It’s the biggest team game and the most susceptible to passing the coronavirus. Unlike baseball, you can’t simple schedule double headers. Once the season is skewed, it’s over.  The NFL is between a rock and a hard place.

TRACE CRISP – PHOTO JOURNALIST
Will never happen unless Dallas is a host.  Jerry Jones will NEVER give up that money.

BARRY JENKINS – GUEST CONTRIBUTOR
Yes, the bubble concept works best.

DAVID ALEXANDER – AFC WEST CORRESPONDENT
The logistical challenge would be enormous.  The NBA’s & NHL’s success (so far) was the result of intense negotiations between the league, the teams, and the players.  We haven’t seen that level of cooperation in the NFL.  You are also dealing with bigger numbers of players, staff and others.  To start the process now would be unwieldy.  I’d love to be a fly on the wall in the meeting when the owners considered where to host the games!
JAMES CARLSON – GUEST CONTRIBUTOR
First, find 4 cities with no bars, lounges, casinos and “gentleman’s” clubs and great room service wings!

JASON RUBIN – AFC EAST CORRESPONDENT
The NFL, the NCAA, and all of the world should take notice of the NBA and NHL bubble. They’ve had zero positive tests and they are a small sample size that shows how this could be managed better.

KAZ RIVARD – NFC NORTH CORRESPONDENT
I think that strategy would provide more manageability, but all it takes is one team to get the virus to spread throughout the bubble. I think it will be far more difficult for the NFL to make up games opposed to MLB. However, it would be a smart approach to consolidate, similar to the “bubble” concept. This should help limit the risks and ensure we see as regular of a season as possible during these times.

LEO HAGGERTY – EDITOR ITS SPORTS MAGAZINE
This is one that sounds good but, in reality, is a logistical nightmare.  What four cities would you put the 32 NFL franchises?  What four locales has the ability to house eight NFL teams and the entourage that accompanies the club?  What four cities have the infrastructure to transport eight professional football teams to and from the stadium?  The answer to all the queries is none.  End of discussion.