POLL QUESTION – APRIL 11
By Leo Haggerty & Friends

DID MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL MAKE A MISTAKE PULLING THE ALL STAR GAME OUT OF ATLANTA?

Ok, here we go.  MLB, after the state of Georgia passed a law that is deemed to be aimed at restricting voting rights, chose to move the All Star game out of Atlanta to Denver.  The recent passing of Atlanta legend Hank Aaron, who would have been memorialized in the city where he broke Babe Ruth’s career home run record, has been taken away by what seems to be a reaction by MLB to a political decision only adds fuel to the fire.

So, with that being said, our poll question this week was an easy decision.

DID MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL MAKE A MISTAKE PULLING THE ALL STAR GAME OUT OF ATLANTA?

I encourage you to take the time to read the opinions below.  I guarantee you will be surprised by the different “takes’ that are being expressed.  Enjoy.

TRACE CRISP – PHOTO JOURNALIST
Major League Baseball made a serious error in judgement entering the political arena in Georgia!  Sports has been the escape from the horrors of politics for hundreds of years.  Racism is the only arena where sports actually prevailed and helped form a better America.  Today’s political climate is a hotbed of misinformation and distrust.  The “Media Moguls” need to rethink this move toward socialism before the people decide to burn it down.  The midterm elections will tell us if the country will unite for or against the Good Ol’ US of A.  Atlas has yet to shrug, but it is teetering on it’s edge.  God save us all if it falls to the left as I am afraid Civil War will break out and the first to fall will be the leaders.

DAVID ALEXANDER – AFC WEST CORRESPONDENT
Major League Baseball moved the All-Star game not because they were pressured by “the libs”, or they were adhering to “cancel culture.” This move was made for economic reasons.  Major League Baseball is above all a corporation, and most major corporations in America realize change is in order. For those who choose to ignore the impact of social change since last summer, there’s a price to be paid — ask the leadership at Coca Cola and Delta Airlines.
I’m no fan of Rob Manfred.  He screwed up the Astros tampering investigation and the selling of the Marlins.  But I give him credit for realizing that moving the All-Star game was necessary.  Imagine the Braves trying to honor the memory of Hank Aaron this summer after the actions of the Georgia legislature!  Manfred realizes the Major League Baseball needs to change.  We’ve heard about a variety of experiments the game is considering.  Theo Epstein is even talking about moving the pitching mound back.  Manfred also realizes another place the game needs to change is in the stands.  Like most corporations, the consumers must identify with the product. Selling nostalgia and “the right way to play the game” isn’t connecting with the next generation of potential fans.
The furor over the All-Star game will pass.  It’s one game and an exhibition game at that.  But it is taking place in a larger context, and MLB was smart enough (this time) to realize the peril of ignoring those forces at work and play.
LEO HAGGERTY – EDITOR ITS SPORTS MAGAZINE
When I read the above opinions, I cannot disagree with either one.  Baseball is steeped in tradition and that may be its Achilles heel.  To say it is not as appealing to the younger generation as the other three major professional sports is an understatement.  Baseball has moved from “America’s Pasttime” to “America’s Past Time” and change needed to be made because fan interest was sinking faster than the Titanic.  The pandemic gave the powers that be the opportunity to initiate change and, to MLB’s credit, they took the ball and ran with it.  I just disagree with the timing as well as the rationale behind moving the All Star game out of Atlanta for two major reasons.  The first is a great majority of the workers who would have benefited financially from the revenue generated by a packed house would have been lower income minorities.  Taking that money away from them is a travesty.  The second is this would have been the perfect opportunity for MLB to honor the memory of Hank Aaron.  Hammerin’ Hank was the one person who was the target of the most racist attacks in the history of sports as he closed in on “The Bambino’s” 714 home run record.  I say this because a very good friend of mine, who just passed away this year, had one job with the Braves while this was transpiring.  His job was open all letters sent to #44 and weed out the “racist hate mail” before it made its way to Aaron. The sad thing is that he told me there were considerably more of those types than of the congratulatory ones.  For those two reasons, I believe this was a huge misstep by MLB and it may be one that ultimately drives fans away permanently.