POLL QUESTION – MAY 23
By ISM Staff & Contributors

SHOULD THE NBA START DRAFTING PLAYER RIGHT OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL

A very interesting subject that was presented to our panel this week.  One that would not only have ramifications on the collegiate level but also in the professional ranks.

S, without further adieu, here’s this week’s query.

SHOULD THE NBA START DRAFTING PLAYER RIGHT OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL?

As you will see as you read below, our staff and contributors cover the entire spectrum of possible scenarios with their responses.  Enjoy.

JOHN LENTZ – NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL ANALYST
Yes! If you go to school you must stay 1 year! The kids that go to school are not that much better than when they came out of high school.

DAVIS ALEXANDER – AFC WEST CORRESPNDENT
Yes, but it will have to come through a change in the collective bargaining agreement.  The NBA has invested in the G League, which will provide high school seniors the opportunity to get paid playing basketball.  Inevitably, this will also improve the college game.

ABIGAIL HOPE – ISM COLUMNIST
I say no. Athletes straight out of high school are young and (often) immature. Not only would they grow and learn a tremendous amount of life lessons in a few short college years, their skills and drive to play at a higher level would only increase. If they are good enough to go to the pros straight out of high school, they would likely have no issue receiving a full ride scholarship to some University, at which they would grow as an athlete and person, and have a 4-year degree to fall back on when it’s time to retire from the game.

MIKE SCHULTZE – CONTRIBUTOR
There are so few that can make it let them go but the forego college eligibility if they do.  Then, if they go to college, they have to play at least two years before being drafted, similar to baseball.  No more one-and-done as it is hurting college game and is a loop hole that needs to be closed.

ANDREW CIOFFI – ISM COLUMNIST
I would say no. High school players are just too young and only a few are fully prepared to make the NBA. This would completely ruin their chances to attend college and, with injuries and a ton of other factors, it would not be beneficial to the athlete. High school players should have to at least play a year of college or compete in a semi professional league, like the G League, to determine if they are fit for the NBA.

ADAM SZNAPSTAJLER – ISM COLUMNIST
I believe that it should be as it is in college baseball. You have the choice to get drafted out of high school but, if you’re not picked, you have to stay 2 years. Making it 3 years would be a little excessive in basketball. This should allow players ready for the NBA to forgo four years in college while keeping the structure of college basketball in tact. Also pay the college players and more will stay.

LEO HAGGERTY – ISM EDITOR
This is really a tough one to answer.  On one hand, you have the collegiate programs that wants that elite talent to come and play at their institution even if it’s for just a year.  On the other hand, you have the NBA that would like to be able to start  acclimating the players that they’ve drafted as soon as possible into their system.  The reason for that is a vast majority of them are just not ready to compete at an NBA level and it will take time for their talent to marinate.  With all of that being said, I believe that high school players should be eligible for the NBA draft upon completion of their senior year in high school with the following caveats.  First, if a player is drafted out of high school and makes an NBA roster, they will have forfeited any collegiate eligibility in basketball.  Second, if a high school senior is draft and plays in the G League and never makes an NBA roster, they will still have collegiate eligibility.  Finally, if a high school player choses to go to college, they will not be able to be drafted by an NBA team until they have completed three years which is similar to what the NFL does.