POLL QUESTION – JUNE 20
By ISM Staff & Contributors

SHOULD MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL BAN THE SHIFT?

With the expansion of computerized planning in Major League Baseball, there’s a continued emphasis of doing everything “using the data” so to speak.  The days of “going with your gut feeling” for most managers are in the past.

It’s all about the analytics.  So, as you would expect, that brings us to our poll question this week.

SHOULD MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL BAN THE SHIFT?

Below are the responses from our staff and contributors.  Enjoy.

AL CURTISS – NFC EAST CORRESPONDENT
You are a Major League Baseball player and you don’t know how to hit to the opposite field or bunt…. You have only yourself to blame!!! Maybe spend some time in the off season working on this skills….crazy thought!

ROB KRIETE – SENIOR WRITER
The shift is fine.  Players insisting on pulling the ball is a disgrace.  Once players slap the ball the other way with regularity, the shift will go away.  RIP situational hitting!

MIKE SIMZAK – AFC NORTH CORRESPONDENT
If you want to avoid the shift, learn to hit opposite field.

DAVID ALEXANDER – AFC WEST CORRESPONDENT
No, but make the infielders stay in the infield!  This will not change until hitters start going to the opposite field. Imagine what Rod Carew or Tony Gwynn would hit in today’s game?
LEO HAGGERTY – EDITOR
Gentlemen, I cannot agree with you more.  Being that I’m an old-timer, some of the younger baseball fans asked me why teams didn’t use the shift back in the 1960’s through to the end of the century.  I had a real easy answer for that and it was this.  If you put a shift on back then, like they do today, the batter would just choke up and hit it away from the shift or just bunt to the open side of the diamond.  The mantra back them was not analytics, where you swing from the heels and either hit it out of the park or walk back to the dugout after taking your three swings.  The modus operandi back then was simply don’t make out and that’s what it should be now.